It’s a simple fact that, even on non-agile teams, groups that don’t share what they know and learn openly will fail. Software development, despite what most people think, should never be a single person focused on a single task. One person cannot know everything and so cannot produce the software quality that multiple minds can bring together. So, to share some of what I’ve learned in my career in agile management, here is my short list Don’t Assume Even if you think your team is communicating, don’t fool yourself. There’s always places to improve – look for them and vet them out. Be sure that everyone’s talking to everyone they need to and that all blockers are being communicated. Voice isn’t enough Sometimes it takes more than a conference call (especially with remote workers) to get the point across. The web is full of collaboration technology (like Zoom, Skype or Google Plus hangouts) that can help get your point across in a more visual way. Grab a webcam, point it at a whiteboard and go to town. Set plans in stone When you come out of your planning meetings, you should accomplish at least one thing – having everyone on the same page when it comes to where the project is headed. Everyone should know what parts of the project they’re working on and how much time they must do it in. Unfortunately, I haven’t quite found the right groove for this one and have had to play catch-up after the meeting to get people headed in the right direction. These are just a few on a list of many I’m sure I’m forgetting, but hopefully they’ll serve as a reminder to myself (and maybe others) for future planning sessions and projects.

Best Advice For Agile Team Communication

It’s a simple fact that, even on non-agile teams, groups that don’t share what they know and learn openly will fail. Software development, despite what most people think, should never be a single person focused on a single task. One person cannot know everything and so cannot produce the software quality that multiple minds can bring together. So, to share some of what I’ve learned in my career in agile management, here is my short list.
Don’t Assume
Even if you think your team is communicating, don’t fool yourself. There’s always places to improve – look for them and vet them out. Be sure that everyone’s talking to everyone they need to and that all blockers are being communicated.
Voice isn’t enough
Sometimes it takes more than a conference call (especially with remote workers) to get the point across. The web is full of collaboration technology (like Zoom, Skype or Google Plus hangouts) that can help get your point across in a more visual way. Grab a webcam, point it at a whiteboard and go to town.
Set plans in stone
When you come out of your planning meetings, you should accomplish at least one thing – having everyone on the same page when it comes to where the project is headed. Everyone should know what parts of the project they’re working on and how much time they must do it in. Unfortunately, I haven’t quite found the right groove for this one and have had to play catch-up after the meeting to get people headed in the right direction.
These are just a few on a list of many I’m sure I’m forgetting, but hopefully they’ll serve as a reminder to myself (and maybe others) for future planning sessions and projects.

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